Why Didn’t Nintendo Just Tell Us the Truth about the NX?

The fake image of the NX controller created with a 3D printer.

Recently some photos of the Nintendo NX controllers leaked onto reddit and then around the rest of the internet, causing quite a bit of stir right away. There was a lash back from fans about how the controller looked and their doubts about how comfortable or practical it would actually be. People were not happy at all.

So it was kind of a relief when the pranksters that leaked the images came forward and admitted that the images weren’t real. In fact, they even told us exactly how they created the images of the hoaxed NX controllers using Photoshop, a 3D printer and a laser cutter. Quite an elaborate set up for just a simple hoax.

While it’s great that the folks behind the images came clean – saying that it was just a simple test to see if they could recreate the design for the controller – many people are asking why Nintendo let this go on as long as it did. They should have come forward first to defend their product and ward off any doubts that the NX would be something that would put off the consumers. Instead they just let the hoax build until the pranksters came forward, why?

Some think that the hoax built up the hype for the NX and Nintendo just let it go on as long as they did to get people talking. Nintendo has been advertising products successfully for years so I have no place to argue their tactics at all. Then again, there’s another opinion that’s circulating around that may be closer to the truth: Nintendo didn’t say anything because the real NX is a lot closer to the hoax NX than they want us believe. With the feedback that the hoax received, Nintendo may be more focused on rethinking their product. What’s your opinion?

In support of the latter theory, this patent design looks a lot like the hoax controller.
In support of the latter theory, this patent design looks a lot like the hoax controller.

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